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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2021, Vol. 48 Issue (3): 649-653    DOI: 10.31083/j.ceog.2021.03.2471
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Prescription patterns of herbal medicine for polycystic ovarian syndrome in major Korean medicine hospitals: a multicenter retrospective study
Hye Won Lee1, Lin Ang2, 3, Myeong Soo Lee2, 3, *(), Kyoung Sun Park4, Jin-Moo Lee5, Chang-Hoon Lee5, Dong Chul Kim6, Jeong-Eun Yoo7, Seung-Jeong Yang8, Tae-Young Choi2
1Herbal Medicine Research Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 34054 Daejeon, South Korea
2Clinical Medicine Division, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 34054 Daejeon, South Korea
3Korean Convergence Medicine, University of Science and Technology, 34113 Daejeon, South Korea
4Jaseng Hospital of Korean Medicine, 06110 Seoul, South Korea
5Department of Korean Medicine Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Korean Medicine Hospital at Gangdong, 05278 Seoul, South Korea
6Department of Gynecology, College of Korean Medicine, Daegu Hanny University, 38610 Gyeongsan, South Korea
7Department of Korean Medicine Obstetrics & Gynecology, College of Korean Medicine, Daejeon University, 34520 Daejeon, South Korea
8Department of Korean Obstetrics & Gynecology, Dongshin University Hospital of Korean Medicine, 58326 Naju, South Korea
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Abstract  
Background: Few studies investigated the prescription patterns of traditional Korean medicine (TKM) therapies for PCOS in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to identify the common symptoms, herbal prescription patterns and types of adjunctive treatment for treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in major traditional Korean medicine (TKM) hospitals. Methods: A retrospective chart review of PCOS patients was used for the study. The study involved the analysis of medical records (ICD-10, polycystic ovary syndrome: E28.2) from four TKM-based university hospitals in South Korea. Results: A total of 120 PCOS patients were analyzed. We found that PCOS patients had a wide range of symptoms, including menstrual irregularity, oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea, acne, infertility, and metrorrhagia. The most commonly prescribed prescriptions for PCOS treatment were Chokyung-san (Tiaojing-san), Gamiguibi-tang (Jiawei Guipi-tang), and Changbudodam-tang (Cangfu Daotan-tang). In addition, patients were most often treated with adjunctive acupuncture and moxibustion. Conclusion: Our study presents the major gynecological herbal prescriptions and other adjunctive therapies used for the treatment of PCOS in TKM-based hospitals. However, further pharmacological investigations and effective clinical trials should be developed to ensure the objectivity of efficacy assessments.
Key words:  Herbal medicine      Polycystic ovary syndrome      Clinical practice based      Retrospective study     
Submitted:  16 January 2021      Revised:  26 February 2021      Accepted:  11 March 2021      Published:  15 June 2021     
Fund: 
K16292/Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine
KSN2013210/Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine
KSN2021240/Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine
*Corresponding Author(s):  drmslee@gmail.com; mslee@kiom.re.kr (Myeong Soo Lee)   

Cite this article: 

Hye Won Lee, Lin Ang, Myeong Soo Lee, Kyoung Sun Park, Jin-Moo Lee, Chang-Hoon Lee, Dong Chul Kim, Jeong-Eun Yoo, Seung-Jeong Yang, Tae-Young Choi. Prescription patterns of herbal medicine for polycystic ovarian syndrome in major Korean medicine hospitals: a multicenter retrospective study. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 649-653.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.31083/j.ceog.2021.03.2471     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2021/V48/I3/649

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