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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2020, Vol. 47 Issue (3): 419-420    DOI: 10.31083/j.ceog.2020.03.5078
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A study to determine if estrogen (E) is needed to induce de novo progesterone (P) receptors on gamma/delta t cells as evidenced by determining the degree of rise of progesterone induced blocking factor (PIBF) following P exposure in males
J.H. Check1, 2, *(), A. DiAntonio2, D.L. Check2, M.P. Dougherty3, G. Diantonio2
1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, New Jersey, USA
2Cooper Institute for Reproductive Hormonal Disorders, P.C., Marlton, New Jersey, USA
3Department Of Obstetrics, Gynecology And Reproductive Sciences, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Robert Wood Hohnson Univeristy Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
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Abstract  

Purpose: To determine if exposure to progesterone (P) alone without prior estrogen (E) exposure can cause a rise in serum progesterone induced blocking factor (PIBF). Materials and Methods: Male volunteers received IM progesterone 100 mg for seven days. Baseline and day seven levels of serum P and PIBF were taken. PIBF was measured using a non-commercial newly developed ELISA assay. Results: A significant rise in PIBF was found in male volunteers on day seven. Conclusions: The precipitous rise in serum PIBF in males despite a short exposure to progesterone shows that a person does not need E to induce PIBF secretion by gamma/delta T cells. The possibility still exists pending future studies that E may improve PIBF secretion.

Key words:  Immunomodulatory proteins      Progesterone      Progesterone induced blocking factor (PIBF)      Males      Estrogen     
Submitted:  03 November 2018      Accepted:  17 November 2018      Published:  15 June 2020     
Fund: 
Actavis (Parsippany, NJ)
*Corresponding Author(s):  JEROME H. CHECK     E-mail:  laurie@ccivf.com

Cite this article: 

J.H. Check, A. DiAntonio, D.L. Check, M.P. Dougherty, G. Diantonio. A study to determine if estrogen (E) is needed to induce de novo progesterone (P) receptors on gamma/delta t cells as evidenced by determining the degree of rise of progesterone induced blocking factor (PIBF) following P exposure in males. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(3): 419-420.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.31083/j.ceog.2020.03.5078     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2020/V47/I3/419

Table 1  — The role of P without estrogen and without an allogeneic stimulus on PIBF expression in males
Baseline 7 days of P
P (ng/mL) PIBF (ng/mL) P (ng/mL) PIBF (ng/mL)
Male 1 0.0 <2 53.2 169.5
Male 2 0.5 10.5 26.7 75.0
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