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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (6): 875-878    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3646.2017
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Attitudes towards female genital mutilation among Sudanese men and women living in Saudi Arabia
A.A. Rouzi1, *(), N. Sahly1, D. Sawan1, N. Mansouri1, N. Alsenani1, N. Bahkali1, D. Bahkali1, H. Abduljabbar1, F. Alzaban2
1 Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
2 Psychiatry at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
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Abstract  
Objective: To assess the attitudes of Sudanese men and women who live in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, towards female genital mutilation (FGM). Materials and Methods: A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was given to Sudanese men and women living in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and attended the out-patients clinics of King Abdulaziz University Hospital to survey their attitudes towards FGM. Results: From March 2014 through February 2015, 580 Sudanese men and women were approached about participating in the study. Of these, 518 (89%) [252 (48.6%) men and 266 (51.4%) women] with a mean age of 39.76 years completed the questionnaire. The mean length of stay in Saudi Arabia was 16.55 ± 10.9 years and 179 (67.3%) women had FGM and 87 (32.7%) did not. Respondents were asked their opinion of FGM: 344 (66.4%) said they were against it, 132 (25.5%) said they were for it, 9 (1.7%) said they did not know, and 33 (6.4%) did not answer. When asked if FGM is a religious practice, 328 (63.3%) said no, 110 (21.2%) said yes, 63 (12.2%) said they did no know, and 17 (3.3%) did not answer. When asked if living in Saudi Arabia changed their views on FGM, 282 (54.4%) said yes, 202 (39%) said no, 19 (3.7%) did not know, and 15 (2.9%) did not answer. Conclusions: Community-led strategies to abandon FGM may help empower men and women to change their attitudes and critically examine their traditions.
Key words:  Female genital mutilation      Attitudes      Sudanese      Saudi Arabia     
Published:  10 December 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  A.A. ROUZI     E-mail:  aarouzi@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

A.A. Rouzi, N. Sahly, D. Sawan, N. Mansouri, N. Alsenani, N. Bahkali, D. Bahkali, H. Abduljabbar, F. Alzaban. Attitudes towards female genital mutilation among Sudanese men and women living in Saudi Arabia. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(6): 875-878.

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https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3646.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I6/875

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