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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (5): 700-703    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3638.2017
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Retrospective evaluation of anaesthesia methods in pregnant women with neurological and neuromuscular syndromes who underwent caesarean section
A. Sargin1, *(), Z. Pestilci Cağıran1, U. Ozdemir Biliç1, B. Tanatti Orhanel1, S. Karaman1
1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation, Ege University School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey
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Abstract  
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the anaesthesia methods used in pregnant women with neurological or neuromuscular disease who underwent caesarean section. Materials and Methods: Demographics; pregnancy weeks, urgent or elective caesarean section, accompanying neurological or neuromuscular diseases, and anaesthesia type. Results: Of the pregnant women operated on, 72% (16),14% (three) and 14% (three) were diagnosed with epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS), and myasthenia gravis (MG), respectively. General anaesthesia was administered in 45%, 40%, and 25% of epileptic pregnant women, patients with MS, and those diagnosed with MG, respectively. Spinal anaesthesia was administered in 55%, 20%, and 75% of epileptic pregnant women, those with MS, and those diagnosed with MG, respectively. Conclusion: Regional anaesthesia may be an appropriate option in pregnant women with neurological or neuromuscular diseases. Epidural anaesthesia may be a safer method in terms of ensuring the control of block level.
Key words:  Epilepsy      Myasthenia gravis      Multiple sclerosis      Obstetrical anaesthesia     
Published:  10 October 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  A. SARGIN     E-mail:  asuozdemir@hotmail.com

Cite this article: 

A. Sargin, Z. Pestilci Cağıran, U. Ozdemir Biliç, B. Tanatti Orhanel, S. Karaman. Retrospective evaluation of anaesthesia methods in pregnant women with neurological and neuromuscular syndromes who underwent caesarean section. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(5): 700-703.

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https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3638.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I5/700

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