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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (1): 154-156    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3334.2017
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Resolution of hydrops fetalis caused by atrioventricular block: good postnatal evolution with terbutaline treatment
J.A. Sainz1, *(), J.A. García Mejido1, J. Grueso2, E. Turmo1, J. Santos2, R. Garrido1
1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Valme University Hospital, Seville, Spain
2 Pediatric Cardiology and Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Department, Virgen del Rocío University Children´s Hospital, Seville, Spain
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Abstract  
Introduction: Complete atrioventricular block (CAVB) is rarely seen, as it occurs in only 1:11 000 to 1:20 000 newborns. There is a serious risk of mortality in CAVB, mainly in those cases associated with hydrops, fetal cardiac frequency ≤ 55 beats/minute, and premature delivery. Case Report: Case of complete atrioventricular block with a poor prognosis (hydrops fetalis and foetal cardiac frequency < 5 beats/minute) caused by anti-La and anti-Ro antibodies. Intrauterine symptoms improved after treatment with terbutaline, permitting foetal viability and successful postnatal treatment with a cardiac pacemaker. Discussion: In case of complete atrioventricular block of cause autoimmune with poor prognosis should be treated with positive inotropic drugs, anticholinergics or b-mimetic in the attempt to maintain adequate ventricular frequency, and thus prevent hydrops fetalis from occurring.
Key words:  Congenital atrioventricular block      Terbutaline      Fetal arrhythmias      Fetal cardiology      Hydrops fetalis     
Published:  10 February 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  J.A. SAINZ     E-mail:  joseantoniosainz@hotmail.es

Cite this article: 

J.A. Sainz, J.A. García Mejido, J. Grueso, E. Turmo, J. Santos, R. Garrido. Resolution of hydrops fetalis caused by atrioventricular block: good postnatal evolution with terbutaline treatment. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(1): 154-156.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3334.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I1/154

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