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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (2): 183-184    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3329.2017
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
The correlation of the degree of abnormal sperm morphology using strict criteria and pregnancy rates following intrauterine insemination (IUI)
J.H. Check1, 2, *(), A. Bollendorf2
1 Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility, Camden, NJ, USA
2 Cooper Institute For Reproductive Hormonal Disorders, P.C., Mt. Laurel, NJ, USA
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Abstract  
Objective: To determine the effect of extremely low sperm morphology on pregnancy rates following intrauterine insemination (IUI) where all other semen parameters were normal. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of all IUI cycles over a two-year period on infertile women age ≤ 35 where all parameters, but morphology had to be normal. The data were evaluated according to seven levels of percentage of normal morphology (NM): 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and ≥ 6%. Results: The percent live delivery was 9.5, 16.7, 8.8, 16.1, 11.4, 12.3, and 10.9%. Conclusions: Morphology of 0% or 1% did not seem to impair pregnancy rates following IUI. More studies are needed but should include determining the confounding effect of the type of morphologic abnormality.
Key words:  Sperm morphology      Strict criteria      Intrauterine insemination      Live birth rate     
Published:  10 April 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  J.H. CHECK     E-mail:  laurie@ccivf.com

Cite this article: 

J.H. Check, A. Bollendorf. The correlation of the degree of abnormal sperm morphology using strict criteria and pregnancy rates following intrauterine insemination (IUI). Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(2): 183-184.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3329.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I2/183

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