Please wait a minute...
Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2019, Vol. 46 Issue (5): 839-841    DOI: 10.12891/ceog4805.2019
Case Report Previous articles | Next articles
A case of postpartum multiple vertebral fractures in a patient with osteogeneis imperfecta
Y. Ikeda1, 2, †*(), A. Komatsu2, †, H. Gomibuchi1
1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kawakita General Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan
Download:  PDF(550KB)  ( 177 ) Full text   ( 5 )
Export:  BibTeX | EndNote (RIS)      
Abstract  

Introduction: Physicians tend to pay limited attention to lower back pain (LBP) during or after pregnancy, since LBP is experienced by about 70% of pregnant females. Although the etiologies of LBP in most cases are left unclarified, there are some cases in which the cause of pain should be identified to avoid disease progression. Case Report: A 32-year-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta experienced LBP after delivery. This LBP was assessed at several hospitals during a three-month period; however, the cause of the pain was not identified. The authors’ intentional examinations revealed that her LBP was caused by five vertebral fractures of Th11, Th12, L1, L2, and L3. The patient stopped breast-feeding and started taking anti-inflammatory drugs, bisphosphonate, calcium, and vitamin D. The LBP was alleviated after six months. Conclusion: Appropriate assessment of LBP is important to prevent disease progression, as potential causes include postpartum vertebral compression fractures.

Key words:  Breast feeding      Lower back pain      Osteogenesis imperfecta      Postpartum      Vertebral fractures     
Published:  10 October 2019     
*Corresponding Author(s):  Y. IKEDA     E-mail:  ikeda.yuji@nihon-u.ac.jp
About author:  Contributed equally.

Cite this article: 

Y. Ikeda, A. Komatsu, H. Gomibuchi. A case of postpartum multiple vertebral fractures in a patient with osteogeneis imperfecta. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(5): 839-841.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog4805.2019     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2019/V46/I5/839

[1] Xue-Li Bai, Xia Cao. Postpartum hemorrhage and prolonged hyperfibrinolysis as complications of uterine cavernous hemangioma: a case report and literature review[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(4): 987-990.
[2] Alexandra Berezowsky, Howard Berger. Gestational weight gain and long-term postpartum weight retention[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 466-471.
[3] Fikret Salık, Mustafa Bıçak. Can requirement for blood transfusion be predicted before delivery? Analysis of risk factors for blood transfusion in patients with postpartumhemorrhage[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 572-577.
[4] Soo-Ho Chung, Chang Woo Choi, Jae Hong Sang. Can we predict and take a proper treatment for postpartum pulmonary embolism? A single institution review of five cases[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(1): 198-202.
[5] S. Yamamura, K. Yamaguchi, I. Hayashi, N. Nagai, N. Sakane, A. Ikeda, M. Takakura, I. Emoto, M. Ujita, K. Kawasaki, K. Abiko, Y. Takao, K. Takakura, I. Konishi. Postpartum hemorrhage is associated with neonatal body weight, pre-pregnancy body mass index, and maternal weight gain[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(6): 920-925.
[6] Y.N. Zhou, Y.C. Teng, G.P. Gan. Study on the effect of electric current intensity stimulation combined with biofeedback pelvic floor muscle training on postpartum pelvic floor dysfunction[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(6): 932-939.
[7] S. Han, S. Choi, S. Nah, G.W. Kim. Wandering spleen in a postpartum female: a case report[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(6): 974-977.
[8] H.M. Kim, J.Y. Lee, W.J. Seong. Multidetector computed tomography to predict heavy bleeding and need for angiographic embolization in patients with postpartum hemorrhage[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(4): 478-482.
[9] J.A. García-Mejido, C. Suarez-Serrano, E.M. Medrano-Sanchez, M.J. Bonomi Barby, A. Armijo Sánchez, J.A. Sainz. Pelvic floor rehabilitation in patients with levator ani muscle avulsion[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(3): 341-347.
[10] S. Coremans, J. Muys, J. De Winter, H. De Raedemaecker, Y. Jacquemyn. Ultrasound by midwives in the postpartum period: feasibility, reproducibility and midwives’ perspectives[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(3): 348-354.
[11] K. Tamura, H. Takahashi, S. Uchida, M. Ogoyama, R. Usui, S. Matsubara. Intrauterine balloon failure: unrecognized placenta accreta spectrum disorders[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(3): 405-408.
[12] S. Dikić, S. Dragojević, L. Nejković, J. Štulić, A. Juri šić, D. Radojičić, A. Diki ć, Dj Radak. Management of the postpartum ovarian and partial cava inferior vein thrombosis[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(2): 299-302.
[13] N. Al-Husban, O. Al-Kuran, M. Khadra, K. Fram. Thrombocytopenia in pregnancy; prevalence, causes and fetomaternal outcome[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(1): 21-26.
[14] K. Lee, S. Lee, H. N. Lee, H. Lim, I. J. Kim, I. Y. Park, M. J. Kim. Uterine necrosis following selective embolization for postpartum hemorrhage: report of four cases and review of literature[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(6): 1020-1025.
[15] Ichiro Miwa, Masahiro Shinagawa, Terumi Miwa, Keiko Ootani, Masakatsu Sase, Yasuhiko Nakamura. Severe postpartum hemorrhage with placental abruption managed by the uterine sandwich: a case report[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(2): 289-290.
No Suggested Reading articles found!