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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2018, Vol. 45 Issue (5): 781-781    DOI: 10.12891/ceog4695.2018
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Intractable severe peri-ovulatory sneezing abrogated by injection of human chorionic gonadotropin
J.H. Check1, 2, *()
1 Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility, Camden, NJ, USA
2 Cooper Institute for Reproductive and Hormonal Disorders, P.C., Mt. Laurel, NJ, USA
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Abstract  
Purpose: To report an unusual physiologic event associated with the peri-ovulatory time: intractable sneezing with an usual corrective treatment. Materials and Methods: A woman was treated with 10,000 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) when the follicle reached maximum maturity and prior to the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. Results: Despite many years of one full day of intractable sneezing in 85% of natural cycles, there was no sneezing in any of the eight treatment cycles with hCG. Conclusions: The rare disorder of peri-ovulatory intractable sneezing may be obviated by an injection of hCG. It is hypothesized that the cause of the sneezing could be related to increased permeability that may occur after the serum estradiol (E2) drops after the LH surge. Unique to this patient was a defect in her nasal passages with an assumptive permeability defect barely able to inhibit absorption of unwanted chemicals that became inadequate with a further increase with the drop in serum E2. The hCG injection may work by limiting the large drop in serum E2.
Key words:  Periovulatory time      Intractable sneezing      Human chorionic gonadotropin      Estradiol      Progesterone     
Published:  10 October 2018     
*Corresponding Author(s):  J.H. CHECK     E-mail:  laurie@ccivf.com

Cite this article: 

J.H. Check. Intractable severe peri-ovulatory sneezing abrogated by injection of human chorionic gonadotropin. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2018, 45(5): 781-781.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog4695.2018     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2018/V45/I5/781

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