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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2018, Vol. 45 Issue (2): 299-302    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3853.2018
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Delayed administration method of clomiphene citrate during the ovulatory phase in patients with a prolonged menstrual cycle
M. Kawamura1, *(), E. Satoi1, R. Kiyoku1, N. Nozaka1, M. Matsuda1, R. Kanda1, H. Kiseki1
1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kohseichuo General Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
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Abstract  
For patients with a prolonged menstrual cycle who do not respond to clomiphene citrate, the drug can be administered again at a higher dose during another cycle. Clomiphene citrate should be administrated two to five days after the start of menstruation; however, enhanced ovulation effects may occur as a potential adverse reaction to high-dose clomiphene citrate therapy, which limits its use. Furthermore, the ovulatory-phase timing of administration differs between normal patients and those with a prolonged menstrual cycle. This indicates clomiphene citrate does not directly act on the ovulatory phase. The authors used a delayed administration of clomiphene citrate without increasing its doses in a patient with a prolonged menstrual cycle who did not respond to conventional clomiphene citrate therapy. They achieved three pregnancies and deliveries in the patient using this method.
Key words:  Intracyclic clomiphene citrate therapy      Menstrual cycle      Delayed administration     
Published:  10 April 2018     
*Corresponding Author(s):  M. KAWAMURA     E-mail:  mkawamura@kohseichuo.jp

Cite this article: 

M. Kawamura, E. Satoi, R. Kiyoku, N. Nozaka, M. Matsuda, R. Kanda, H. Kiseki. Delayed administration method of clomiphene citrate during the ovulatory phase in patients with a prolonged menstrual cycle. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2018, 45(2): 299-302.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3853.2018     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2018/V45/I2/299

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