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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2019, Vol. 46 Issue (6): 903-905    DOI: 10.12891/ceog4869.2019
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Maternal mortality in Serbia - revisited
M. Petronijevic1, 2, *(), S. V. Petronijevic1, 2, I. Ivan3, K. Maja3, D. Bratic2
1Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
2Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia
3Institute of Public Health of Serbia "Dr. Milan Jovanovic Batut", Belgrade, Serbia
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Abstract  

Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to analyze maternal mortality in Republic of Serbia. Materials and Methods: Maternal mortality in Republic of Serbia was analysed in two periods, 2007-2011 and 2012-2016. Sources of data for this analysis were: Population statistics notices of Statistical Office of Serbia and Health Statistical Yearbooks of Republic of Serbia Institute of Public Health of Serbia "Dr. Milan Jovanovic Batut". Results: Maternal mortality ratio in Serbia, although relatively high, in the last six years shows a declining trend (from 14.9 in 2012 to 10.8 per 100,000 live births in 2016). Conclusion: To promote and preserve the health of women of childbearing age, it is necessary to insure greater social and economic security of all women, especially in the period of maternity, pro-natal policy of the state, and the protection of the family. A significant reduction in maternal mortality can be achieved by early diagnosis, prompt treatment, and rehabilitation after certain illnesses.

Key words:  Maternal      Mortality      Serbia      Childbearing age     
Published:  10 December 2019     
*Corresponding Author(s):  M. PETRONIJEVIC     E-mail:  ordinacija.petronijevic@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

M. Petronijevic, S. V. Petronijevic, I. Ivan, K. Maja, D. Bratic. Maternal mortality in Serbia - revisited. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(6): 903-905.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog4869.2019     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2019/V46/I6/903

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