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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2019, Vol. 46 Issue (3): 403-407    DOI: 10.12891/ceog4713.2019
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Safety of amniocentesis in normal pregnancies and pregnancies considered high-risk due to fetal genetic anomalies - an observational study
W. Homola1, *(), M. Zimmer1
1Second Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Wroclaw Medical University, Wrocław, Poland
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Abstract  

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of clinical and demographic factors on the further course of pregnancy and post-procedure complications in healthy and high-risk pregnancies. Materials and Methods: Data of 230 amniocenteses with normal (n=174) and abnormal genetic findings (n=56) were collected retrospectively. Details of birth, neonatal condition, patient characteristics, and post-procedure complications were analysed. Results: The mean maternal age at amniocentesis was 34.50 ± 5 years-old. One hundred (43.48%) were followed by at least one complication. Fetal death occurred after 11 (4.78%) procedures including seven with genetic disorders. There was no significant difference in complication rates between study groups, except for fetal death, which was significantly more common in high-risk pregnancies (p = 0.0017). Abdominal pain correlated with pyrexia and vaginal bleeding. Conclusion: The most severe complications were associated with fetal genetic disorders. The authors conclude that amniocentesis is a safe procedure; however, significant correlations between the incidence of certain complications may be relevant in planning antenatal care.

Key words:  Amniocentesis      Adverse effects      Congenital abnormalities      Prenatal care      Prenatal diagnosis     
Published:  10 June 2019     
*Corresponding Author(s):  W. HOMOLA     E-mail:  wojtek.homola@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

W. Homola, M. Zimmer. Safety of amniocentesis in normal pregnancies and pregnancies considered high-risk due to fetal genetic anomalies - an observational study. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(3): 403-407.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog4713.2019     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2019/V46/I3/403

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