Please wait a minute...
Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2018, Vol. 45 Issue (5): 767-772    DOI: 10.12891/ceog4477.2018
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Effect of valethamate bromide in accelerating labor: a prospective randomized controlled trial
A. Kocak1, O. Aldemir2, M. Turgal2, *(), S. Erkaya2
1 Omer Halisdemir University, Teaching and Research Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nigde, Turkey
2 Health Sciences University, Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Maternity and Women's Health Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
Download:  PDF
Export:  BibTeX | EndNote (RIS)      
Abstract  
Objective: This prospective randomized study aimed to investigate the effect of valethamate bromide on the length of labor. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 pregnant women, who were in the 37-41 weeks of gestation, and in the active phase of labor with cervical dilatation of 6-7 cm, were included in the study. Twenty-four pregnant women that underwent cesarean section and 33 pregnant women that required oxytocin were not included in the final statistical analysis. Finally, 71 nulliparous and 72 multiparous women were randomized to four groups according to whether they received valethamate bromide or not. Groups 1 and 2 consisted of 35 nulliparous and 37 multiparous women, respectively receiving 16 mg of valethamate bromide, whereas groups 3 and 4 consisted of 36 nulliparous and 35 multiparous women, respectively, not receiving any medication, and both groups were considered as the control group. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of mean maternal age and gestational age (p > 0.05). Evaluating the groups in terms of drug side effects such as maternal tachycardia, dry mouth, flushing, headache, nausea, and vomiting, no statistically significant difference was determined between the valethamate bromide groups (groups 1 and 2) and the controls (p > 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the study groups (group 1 vs. 3 and groups 2 vs. 4) in terms of the time from the rupture of the membranes to the second stage of labor (p > 0.05). Contrarily, the median length of the second stage of labor was 35 (5-70) minutes and 42.5 (10-70) minutes for groups 1 and 3, respectively, in the nulliparous women and the difference between the groups was considered statistically significant (p = 0.045). For the multiparous women, the median length of the second stage of labor was 12 (5-30) minutes in group 2 and 15 (5-40) minutes in group 4 and no statistically significant difference was determined between the groups (p > 0.05). The median time from the rupture of the membranes to the delivery was 100 (10-235) minutes and 87.5 (20-395) minutes in groups 1 and 3, respectively, and 50 (25-365) minutes and 50 (10-390) minutes in groups 2 and 4, respectively. No statistically significant difference was determined between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Valethamate bromide significantly shortens the second stage of labor in nulliparous women.
Key words:  Valethamate bromide      Delivery      Duration      Cervical dilatation      Spasmolytic      Labor     
Published:  10 October 2018     
*Corresponding Author(s):  M. TURGAL     E-mail:  mertturgal@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

A. Kocak, O. Aldemir, M. Turgal, S. Erkaya. Effect of valethamate bromide in accelerating labor: a prospective randomized controlled trial. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2018, 45(5): 767-772.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog4477.2018     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2018/V45/I5/767

[1] Marcelo Epsztein Kanczuk, Nicholas J Lightfoot, Alison Pighills, Antony Ji, Casey Steele, Daniel Bartlett. The time to perform spinal or general anaesthesia in COVID-19 positive parturients requiring emergency caesarean delivery: a prospective crossover simulation study[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(5): 1099-1106.
[2] Eser Ağar, Seda Şahin Aker. Effect of sexual dysfunction on women's preference for delivery methods: a social media-based survey[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(5): 1154-1161.
[3] Uros Visic, Tatjana Stopar Pintaric, Tit Albreht, Iva Blajic, Miha Lucovnik. Multimodal stepwise analgesia for reducing opioid consumption after cesarean delivery[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(5): 1162-1166.
[4] Neža Sofija Pristov, Ela Rednak, Ksenija Geršak, Andreja Trojner Bregar, Miha Lučovnik. Changes in uterine electromyography according to cervical dilatation in the first stage of labor[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(4): 883-887.
[5] Valeria Filippi, Luigi Raio, Sophia Amylidi-Mohr, Rudolf Tschudi, Daniele Bolla. Epidural analgesia at trial of labour after caesarean section. A retrospective cohort study over 12 years[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(4): 913-917.
[6] Aizura Syafinaz Ahmad Adlan, Vikneswaran Virasamy, Doris Ng Sin-Wen, Noor Azmi Mat Adenan. 8 am versus 8 pm labour induction with dinoprostone vaginal tablets in term pregnancies with unfavourable cervices—a randomised controlled trial[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 523-527.
[7] Hidayet Sal, Emine Seda Guvendag Guven, Suleyman Guven. The relationship between fetal thymus volume and preterm birth in dichorionic diamniotic pregnancies[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 528-533.
[8] Batool Ali H. Alkhazal, Majed Abdullah Halawani, Ibtihal Omar Alsahabi, Hassan S.O. Abduljabbar. The preferred mode of delivery among primigravida Middle Eastern Women. A questionnaire based study[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 567-571.
[9] Faris Mujezinović, Veronika Anzeljc, Monika Sobočan, Iztok Takač. Do women in Slovenia prefer vaginal birth after prior caesarean and what hinders its successful outcome? A single institution retrospective analysis[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 607-614.
[10] Antonio Coviello, Concetta Posillipo, Ludovica Golino, Carlo De Angelis, Elisabetta Gragnano, Gabriele Saccone, Marilena Ianniello, Gaetano Castellano, Annachiara Marra, Alfredo Maresca, Maria Vargas, Giuseppe Servillo. Anesthesiologic management of pregnant women with SARS-COV-2 infection undergoing cesarean delivery[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 628-630.
[11] Ugo Indraccolo, Maria Giulia Lombana Marino, Beatrice Bianchi, Silvia Catagini, Danila Morano, Pantaleo Greco. Symphysis-fundal height correlates with adverse delivery and neonatal outcomes in induced full-term and premature pregnancies[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 637-641.
[12] Hyun Jin Ko, Seong Yeon Hong, Jin Young Bae. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes of hyperglycemia caused by atosiban administration during pregnancy[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(2): 257-262.
[13] Kumari Anukriti, Kiran Guleria, Vipin Tyagi, Amita Suneja, B D Banerjee. Maternal blood and amnionic oxytocin receptor gene expression and serum oxytocin levels in preterm birth: a case-control study[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(2): 283-291.
[14] Kaori Kawakami, Yuria Tanaka, Yuji Ikeda, Atsushi Komatsu, Osamu Kobayashi, Takahiro Nakajima, Takehiro Nakao, Chiaki Takeya, Mikiko Asai-Sato, Fumihisa Chishima, Misako Iwata, Kei Kawana. Is routine X-ray pelvimetry of value to decide on mode of delivery for women with labor dystocia?[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(2): 317-322.
[15] Narges Momenyan, Ali Asghar Safaei, Sedighe Hantoushzadeh. Immersive virtual reality analgesia in un-medicated laboring women (during stage 1 and 2): a randomized controlled trial[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(1): 110-116.
No Suggested Reading articles found!