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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2018, Vol. 45 Issue (2): 155-158    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3851.2018
Editorial Article | Next articles
The pros and cons of the requirement by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) for their members who perform in vitro fertilization and related procedures to report their pregnancy rates to the center for disease control
J.H. Check1, 2, *()
1 Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, NJ, USA
2 Cooper Institute for Reproductive and Hormonal Disorders, P.C., Mt. Laurel, NJ, USA
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Abstract  
Purpose: To present pros and cons of the requirement of in vitro fertilization (IVF) centers, to record their statistics, and make them public. Materials and Methods: Various tricks are presented as to how some IVF centers can “pad” their pregnancy rates. Results: Some of these “tricks” include not trying as hard with the patients’ own oocytes but steering them into donor oocyte programs because, though they could eventually get pregnant with their own eggs, it could be at the detriment of the given IVF center's pregnancy rates, which in turn, could be “bad for business”. Conclusions: Published statistics help a patient to choose an experienced center with a good pregnancy rate, but the consumer should not necessarily equate the IVF center with the highest pregnancy rates as the best center for their problem.
Key words:  Diminished oocyte reserve      Blastocysts transfer      Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis      Embryo stockpiling      Donor oocyte     
Published:  10 April 2018     
*Corresponding Author(s):  J.H. CHECK     E-mail:  laurie@ccivf.com

Cite this article: 

J.H. Check. The pros and cons of the requirement by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) for their members who perform in vitro fertilization and related procedures to report their pregnancy rates to the center for disease control. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2018, 45(2): 155-158.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3851.2018     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2018/V45/I2/155

[1] J.H. Check, D. Summers, D. Horwath, J.K. Choe. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for a single gene mutation for succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (the genetic basis for malignant paraganglioma) with successful pregnancy[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(3): 473-475.
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[4] J.H. Check, C. Wilson, K. Levine, R. Cohen, D. Corley. Improved implantation and live delivered pregnancy rates following transfer of embryos derived from donor oocytes by single injection of leuprolide in mid-luteal phase[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(4): 429-430.
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[12] J.H. Check, B. Katsoff, D. Brasile, C. Wilson, D. Summers-Chase. Comparison of pregnancy outcome following frozen embryo transfer (ET) in a gestational carrier program according to source of the oocytes[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2011, 38(1): 26-27.
[13] R. Cohen, J.H. Check. Recurrent aneuploidy - fact or fiction[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2010, 37(3): 175-177.
[14] J.H. Check, B. Katsoff, T. Jamison, J.K. Choe, D. Brasile, J. Amui. A novel method to assess the effect of uterine senescence by comparing pregnancy outcome in younger donors vs older recipients who are sharing a common pool of oocytes[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2010, 37(2): 97-98.
[15] B. Katsoff, J. H. Check, E. Davies, C. Wilson. Evaluation of the effect of endometriosis on oocyte quality and endometrial environment by comparison of donor and recipient outcomes following embryo transfer in a shared oocyte program[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2006, 33(4): 201-202.
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