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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2021, Vol. 48 Issue (5): 1206-1214    DOI: 10.31083/j.ceog4805192
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Circulating neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis
Zhu Chen1, 2, †, Hui Huang3, †, Jingcen Hu4, Shuyu Wang4, Liang Xia1, 2, *()
1Hwa Mei Hospital, Key Laboratory of Diagnosis and Treatment of Digestive System Tumors of Zhejiang Province, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 315201 Ningbo, Zhejiang, China
2Ningbo Institute of Life and Health Industry, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 315010, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Affiliated Hospital, Ningbo University School of Medicine, 315211 Ningbo, Zhejiang, China
4Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, 315211 Ningbo, Zhejiang, China
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Abstract  
Background: Many studies have assessed the role of circulating neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) on the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but the results remain uncertain. Thus, this study aimed to assess the association between NGAL and GDM risk by performing a meta-analysis. Methods: We carried out a systematic search of electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Wanfang and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases) to retrieve all related studies. The estimates of standardized mean difference (SMD) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated in a random-effects model. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I2. Results: Of all included 17 studies, 1080 pregnant women with GDM and 1736 controls were finally included in our analysis. The overall estimate indicated that circulating NGAL levels were higher in the GDM cases comparing to normal pregnant women (SMD: 3.16; 95% CI: 2.28, 4.04; p < 0.001). In stratified analyses, larger differences were observed in women with maternal age <30 years compared to those with maternal age ≥30 years (SMD 4.23 vs. 1.30), and among studies with BMI not matched compared to BMI matched studies (SMD: 4.29 vs. 2.63), but no difference was observed in Caucasian population (SMD: 1.68; 95% CI: –0.68, 3.99; p = 0.157). Conclusion: Our findings show that elevated levels of circulating NGAL might be more likely to be found among GDM women. Circulating NGAL might be a helpful detecting marker for the judgment of the occurrence of GDM. Nevertheless, further prospective studies are needed to assess this potential role.
Key words:  Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin      Gestational diabetes mellitus      Meta-analysis      Early diagnosis      Insulin resistance     
Submitted:  31 May 2021      Revised:  02 August 2021      Accepted:  17 August 2021      Published:  15 October 2021     
Fund: 
2019A21003/Ningbo Clinical Research Center for Digestive System Tumors
*Corresponding Author(s):  Liang Xia     E-mail:  aliangnewcomer@163.com
About author:  These authors contributed equally.

Cite this article: 

Zhu Chen, Hui Huang, Jingcen Hu, Shuyu Wang, Liang Xia. Circulating neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(5): 1206-1214.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.31083/j.ceog4805192     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2021/V48/I5/1206

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