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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2021, Vol. 48 Issue (5): 1178-1185    DOI: 10.31083/j.ceog4805188
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Dietary assessment, nutrition knowledge, and pregnancy outcome in high-risk pregnant Korean women
Min Jung Kim1, †, Hee-Sook Lim2, †, Hae-Hyeog Lee3, Tae-Hee Kim3, *(), Yongsoon Park1, *()
1Department of Food & Nutrition, Hanyang University, 04763 Seoul, Republic of Korea
2Department of Gerontology, Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, 17104 Yongin, Republic of Korea
3Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, 14584 Bucheon, Republic of Korea
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Abstract  
Background: The nutritional status of pregnant women has a significant impact on maternal health, fetal growth, and pregnancy outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations among advanced maternal age, eating habits, knowledge level, and obstetric outcome in pregnant women. Methods: We conducted an observational single center study of 168 pregnant women. The participants were divided into three groups by age: group I (≤29 years old, n = 36), group II (30 to 34 years old, n = 87), and group III (≥35 years old, n = 45). We studied general features, dietary habits, nutritional knowledge and necessity of education, and understanding of dietary guidelines and practice of them. Results: The pre-pregnancy weight of pregnant women significantly increased with age (p = 0.002), and the group I pregnant women were more likely to be underweight, while rates of overweight and obesity were higher in the group III women than the other groups (p < 0.001). Frequencies of hypertension and gestational diabetes tended to increase as the age of mother increased. In the assessment of level of knowledge of information about pregnancy, childbearing, and infant care, pregnant women who responded "do not know at all or do not know" was higher in group I than group III (p = 0.025). During pregnancy, the experience of having received counseling or education was less common in group I compared to the other groups, but the difference was not statistically significant. The total score for dietary action guidelines was lower in group I, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The pregnancy outcome will be good, despite advanced maternal age, if they have good nutritional status, a healthy lifestyle, good and knowledge of nutrition.
Key words:  Education      Nutrition      Age      Pregnancy     
Submitted:  02 March 2021      Revised:  26 April 2021      Accepted:  20 May 2021      Published:  15 October 2021     
*Corresponding Author(s):  heeobgy@schmc.ac.kr (Tae-Hee Kim); yongsoon@hanyang.ac.kr (Yongsoon Park)   
About author:  These authors contributed equally.

Cite this article: 

Min Jung Kim, Hee-Sook Lim, Hae-Hyeog Lee, Tae-Hee Kim, Yongsoon Park. Dietary assessment, nutrition knowledge, and pregnancy outcome in high-risk pregnant Korean women. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(5): 1178-1185.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.31083/j.ceog4805188     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2021/V48/I5/1178

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