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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2021, Vol. 48 Issue (4): 955-961    DOI: 10.31083/j.ceog4804151
Special Issue: Modern trends in reproductive surgery
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Doula support in office hysteroscopy: results from a pilot study
Rocio Montejo1, *(), Jonas Hermansson1, Lena Sandin Wranker1, 2, Louise Danielsson1, 3
1Department of Research and Development, SV Hospital Group, 42422 Angered, Sweden
2Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Centre for Ageing and Health, University of Gothenburg, AGECAP, 41138 Gothenburg, Sweden
3Department of Health and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 41138 Gothenburg, Sweden
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Abstract  
Background: This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of doula support in office hysteroscopy and the potential effectiveness of doula support during office hysteroscopy to reduce anxiety and pain. Methods: Twenty-eight women, median age 43.5 (range 21–73), with indications for office hysteroscopy received doula support (intervention) or routine care (control group) during the procedure. Feasibility was measured in terms of successful office hysteroscopies, duration, and adverse events. Outcome measures were Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-S (STAI-S), and the Numeric Rate Scale (NRS) for pain intensity. Results: The results showed similar success rates, duration, and adverse events between the groups, with no differences in reported pain intensity. Both groups had high, comparable levels of anxiety before the procedure (Doula group mean STAI-S score = 45.4, control group = 45.8). After the procedure, the doula group showed slightly increased anxiety while the control group showed slightly decreased anxiety. There was a significant difference between groups favoring the control group when comparing STAI-S mean score post-procedure (48.6 in the Doula group versus 44.1 in the control group p = 0.033). However, when analyzing the mean change across groups (p = 0.205) that difference was not significant. Discussion: To conclude, this pilot study suggests that Doula support may be feasible but not superior to routine care support in office hysteroscopy. High anxiety levels may be more relevant than pain during the procedure. Further investigation of the state and trait anxiety in office hysteroscopy populations in different health care contexts is recommended.
Key words:  Anxiety      Doula support      Human support      Office hysteroscopy      Pilot study     
Submitted:  26 April 2021      Revised:  08 May 2021      Accepted:  08 June 2021      Published:  15 August 2021     
*Corresponding Author(s):  Rocio Montejo     E-mail:  rocio.montejo.rodriguez@vgregion.se

Cite this article: 

Rocio Montejo, Jonas Hermansson, Lena Sandin Wranker, Louise Danielsson. Doula support in office hysteroscopy: results from a pilot study. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(4): 955-961.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.31083/j.ceog4804151     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2021/V48/I4/955

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