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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2021, Vol. 48 Issue (4): 929-934    DOI: 10.31083/j.ceog4804147
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Microbiological pattern of laboratory confirmed vaginal infections among Saudi women
Dalia Saad ElFeky1, 2, Rasha Assiri1, Hanadi Bakhsh3, 4, *(), Ruba Almubaraz3, Afrah Aldhowayan3, Shahad Ismail Alruwaili3, Raghad Alomairy3
1Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, 11564 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, 12613 Giza, Egypt
3Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, 11564 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr. Sulaiman Al Habib Medical Group, 11393 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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Abstract  
Background: Imbalance in vaginal microbiota causes vaginal infection in women in mainly reproductive age. This study aimed to determine the microbiological and epidemiological profile of laboratory confirmed vaginal infections among Saudi women. Methods: This cross-sectional retrospective study involved medical records of Saudi women patients with laboratory confirmed vaginal infections from a private hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 2015 and January 2019. Results: Among the 4300 medical records that were reviewed, 564 (13.1%) had laboratory-confirmed vaginal infections. Data was collected about participant's personal and social data, medical history, primary presenting symptom, associated symptoms, obstetric and gynecological history, results of vaginal examination, the results of microbiological tests of vaginal swab specimens, and treatment given, using a data sheet. Sample collected were examined for bacterial vaginosis (BV), Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), trichomonal vaginitis (TV), Group B Streptococcus (GBS) and other infections. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 21. VVC was the most common type (57.4%) followed by GBS (25%) and BV (12.1%). Vaginal infections were found to be associated with reproductive age group and high BMI. Most of the included patients did not have classic risk factors for vaginal infections. Discussion: The medical records of 564 patients, all with laboratory-confirmed vaginal infections were included in this study, which represents 13.1% of all patients who had attended the clinic during the study period. The mean age of the participants in this study was 40.97 ± 8.5 years.
Key words:  Bacterial vaginosis      Group B streptococci      Vaginal discharge      Vaginal infections      Vulvovaginal candidiasis     
Submitted:  03 March 2021      Revised:  03 April 2021      Accepted:  27 April 2021      Published:  15 August 2021     
*Corresponding Author(s):  Hanadi Bakhsh     E-mail:  drobgyn2005@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

Dalia Saad ElFeky, Rasha Assiri, Hanadi Bakhsh, Ruba Almubaraz, Afrah Aldhowayan, Shahad Ismail Alruwaili, Raghad Alomairy. Microbiological pattern of laboratory confirmed vaginal infections among Saudi women. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(4): 929-934.

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https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.31083/j.ceog4804147     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2021/V48/I4/929

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