Please wait a minute...
Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2021, Vol. 48 Issue (4): 860-866    DOI: 10.31083/j.ceog4804136
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Increased nuchal translucency and fetal outcomes: a population-based study in Thailand
Kuntharee Traisrisilp1, Supatra Sirichotiyakul1, Fuanglada Tongprasert1, Kasemsri Srisupundit1, Suchaya Luewan1, Phudit Jatavan1, Sirinart Sirilert1, Theera Tongsong1, *()
1Maternal Fetal Medicine Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 50200 Chiang Mai, Thailand
Download:  PDF(596KB)  ( 55 ) Full text   ( 9 )
Export:  BibTeX | EndNote (RIS)      
Abstract  
Background: To determine the association between increased nuchal translucency (INT) and fetal outcomes among Thai population. Methods: A prospective database of fetal Down syndrome screening project was accessed to enable retrieval of the records of any women with recorded NT measurements. The selected pregnancies were categorized into the INT group (>95th percentile) and the normal (<95th percentile) group. The effectiveness of NT for prediction of Down syndrome and hemoglobin Bart's disease was also determined. Pregnancy outcomes were compared, also using multivariate analysis to correct the major confounders. Results: Out of 8225 NT measurements recorded, data from 7126 fetuses were available for analysis. These included 357 in the INT group and 6769 in the normal group. INT was significantly associated with Turner syndrome, Down syndrome, Edwards' syndrome, Patau syndrome, cardiac defect and Hb Bart's disease. After exclusion of fetal abnormalities, rates of abortion, low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth and intrauterine death (IUD) were significantly higher in the INT group, with adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) of 7.82 (7.48–13.66), 0.60 (0.42–0.86) and 5.10 (1.11–23.42), respectively. INT was effective in predicting Down syndrome with a sensitivity of 61.1% with a false positive rate of 5%. Conclusions: In addition to effectiveness in screening aneuploidy and cardiac defect, INT significantly increased the identification of risk of some diseases specific to a certain geographical area, for example Hb Bart's disease in Thailand. Among the euploid fetuses in this study the rate of abortion, LBW, preterm birth and IUD were also significantly increased.
Key words:  Chromosome abnormality      Fetal anomaly      Fetal outcomes      Hemoglobin Bart's disease      Nuchal translucency     
Submitted:  13 January 2021      Revised:  03 March 2021      Accepted:  10 March 2021      Published:  15 August 2021     
Fund: 
DPG6280003/Thailand Research Fund
CMU-2564/Chiang Mai University Research Fund
*Corresponding Author(s):  Theera Tongsong     E-mail:  theera.t@cmu.ac.th

Cite this article: 

Kuntharee Traisrisilp, Supatra Sirichotiyakul, Fuanglada Tongprasert, Kasemsri Srisupundit, Suchaya Luewan, Phudit Jatavan, Sirinart Sirilert, Theera Tongsong. Increased nuchal translucency and fetal outcomes: a population-based study in Thailand. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(4): 860-866.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.31083/j.ceog4804136     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2021/V48/I4/860

[1] Keren Grinberg. The relationships between sociodemographic characteristics and attitudes to induced abortion following detected fetal anomaly[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(3): 642-648.
[2] Elisa Zambrotta, Luisa Maria Di Gregorio, Federica Di Guardo, Roberta Agliozzo, Giuliana Chiara Maugeri, Ferdinando Antonio Gulino, Silvia Cutello, Maria Cecilia Cerana, Marco Palumbo. Congenital uterine anomalies and perinatal outcomes: a retrospective single-center cohort study[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(1): 160-163.
[3] A.S. Adlan, M.F. Zainal Abidin, C.C.W. Yim. Difference in outcomes of category 1 caesarean section patients in relation to type of anaesthesia administered: a tertiary university hospital experience[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2018, 45(2): 245-248.
[4] L. Zhen, A.H. Wu, C. Liao, D.Z. Li. Prediction of homozygous α-thalassemia-1 by nuchal translucency measurement at first trimester: is it possible?[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(4): 545-547.
[5] C. R. Gaggero, S. Bogliolo, P. Sala, C. Molinari, M. Motzo, E. Fulcheri, P. Anserini, P. De Biasio. Diginyc partial hydatidiform mole with increased fetal nuchal translucency and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2016, 43(3): 467-469.
[6] A. Ekin, C. Gezer, C.E. Taner, M. Ozeren, M.E. Avci, S. Ciftci, A. Dogan, N.S. Gezer. Fetal abdominal wall defects: six years experience at a tertiary center[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(3): 327-330.
[7] A. Daniilidis, D. Balaouras, N. Psarra, D. Chitzios, M. Tzafettas, G. Balaouras, N. Vrachnis. Increased nuchal translucency and diaphragmatic hernia. A case report[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(2): 237-239.
[8] S. Hacivelioglu, A. Uysal, A.N. Cakir Gungor, M. Gencer, D.U. Cakir, E. Cosar. The effect of maternal polycystic ovary morphology on first-trimester maternal serum biochemical markers of aneuploidy and fetal nuchal translucency thickness[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(1): 32-35.
[9] Y. Duan, Y. Li, Q. Xue. Serological prenatal screening and diagnosis for Down syndrome[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2014, 41(5): 572-574.
[10] F. Bonilla-Musoles, F. Raga, F. Bonilla Jr., J.C. Castillo, N.G. Osborne, O. Caballero. Semi-automatic Sono T measurement of nuchal translucency[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2013, 40(4): 505-509.
[11] E. Manolakos, P. Peitsidis, A. Garas, A. Vetro, M. Eleftheriades, M.B. Petersen, I. Papoulidis. First trimester diagnosis of 13q-syndrome associated with increased fetal nuchal translucency thickness. Clinical findings and systematic review[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2012, 39(1): 118-121.
[12] G.O. Ajayi. Is there any effect of fetal gender on the markers of first trimester Down's Syndrome screening?[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2011, 38(2): 162-164.
[13] E. Tarim, T. Cok, S. Hacivelioglu, T. Bagis. Low molecular weight heparin and first trimester maternal PAPP-A and hCG levels, fetal nuchal translucency in the first trimester of pregnancy[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2011, 38(1): 81-83.
[14] F. B. Cebesoy, O. Balat, E. Dikensoy, M. G. Ugur, I. Kutlar, H. Kalayci. Role of dietary habits on fetal anomaly development: Review of 315 consecutive fetal anomaly cases[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2008, 35(4): 267-271.
[15] Y. Jacquemyn. Bilateral cleft lip and palate associated with increased nuchal translucency and maternal cocaine abuse at 14 weeks of gestation[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2003, 30(2-3): 109-110.
No Suggested Reading articles found!