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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2020, Vol. 47 Issue (1): 89-92    DOI: 10.31083/j.ceog.2020.01.5205
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy: an Italian experience
F. Fabbian1, 5, *(), A. Coppola2, R. Cappadona2, A. De Giorgi1, S. Fanaro3, E. Di Simone4, R. Manfredini1, 5, P. Greco2, M. A. Rodríguez Borrego5, P. J. López Soto5
1Department of Medical Sciences, Hypertension Center and Clinica Medica Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Prevention, University of Ferrara, University Hospital St. Anna, Ferrara, Italy
2Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Prevention, University of Ferrara, University Hospital St. Anna, Ferrara, Italy
3Department of Medical Sciences, Pediatrics and Neonatology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy and Prevention, University of Ferrara, University Hospital St. Anna, Ferrara, Italy
4General Medicine, University Hospital St. Anna, Ferrara, Italy
5Maimonides Institute for Biomedical Research in Córdoba, Faculty of Medicine and Nursing, University of Córdoba, Spain
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Abstract  

Objective: To describe the impact of a collaborative Italian diagnostic pathway offering ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) in High Risk Antenatal Clinic (HRAC) pregnant women. The study included 395 pregnant women evaluated at HRAC between 2012 and 2016, while analyzing demographic, clinical characteristics, and prescription of ABPM. Pregnant women were firstly seen when gestational age was 19.6 ± 9.6 weeks. In at least one-third of cases, ABPM was followed by medical intervention aiming to modify the pre-existing therapeutic treatment. Hypertension and overweight were the main reasons for performing ABPM. WCH: white-coat hypertension.

Key words:  High risk antenatal clinic      Pregnancy      Hypertension      Obesity      Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring     
Published:  15 February 2020     
*Corresponding Author(s):  F. Fabbian     E-mail:  f.fabbian@ospfe.it

Cite this article: 

F. Fabbian, A. Coppola, R. Cappadona, A. De Giorgi, S. Fanaro, E. Di Simone, R. Manfredini, P. Greco, M. A. Rodríguez Borrego, P. J. López Soto. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy: an Italian experience. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(1): 89-92.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.31083/j.ceog.2020.01.5205     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2020/V47/I1/89

Table 1  — Reasons for referral of pregnant women to high risk antenatal clinic.
Fetal growth restriction 27 (6.8%)
Diabetes mellitus 134 (33.9%)
Type I diabetes mellitus 24 (17.9% of diabetic women)
Type II diabetes mellitus 4 (3% of diabetic women)
Gestational diabetes 106 (79% of diabetic women)
Pre-eclampsia during a previous pregnancy 14 (3.5%)
Hypertension 77 (19.4%)
Overweight 97 (24.5%)
Excessive weight gain 11 (2.8%)
Rheumatological diseases 61 (15.4%)
Heart diseases 19 (4.8%)
Kidney diseases 14 (3.5%)
Figure 1.  — Decision tree analysis evaluating patients who underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Hypertension and overweight are the main reasons for performing ABPM.

Table 2  — Number of ABPM procedures and variation to antihypertensive treatment (AHT).
ABPM Women (n) Women (%) Variation to AHT (n) Variation to AHT (%)
1 87 22 29 33.3
2 55 13.9 29 34.5
3 34 8.6 13 38.2
>3 11 2.8 10 90.9
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