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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2019, Vol. 46 Issue (3): 349-352    DOI: 10.12891/ceog5080.2019
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Brainstem injury in victims of sudden intrauterine death syndrome (SIUDS) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
L. Roncati1, *(), A. Manenti1, F. Piscioli1
1Department of Maternal, Infant and Adult Medical and Surgical Sciences, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy
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Abstract  

Introduction: Sudden intrauterine death syndrome (SIUDS) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) are often associated in a single pathology, resulting from an unexpected fetal or infant injury. Among the various causes, the action of external toxics, still current in the West, should not be excluded. The present histopathological observations indicate the brainstem nuclei as possible neuronal targets of toxic substances; these cause direct damage to cells, including those at the mitochondrial level, as well as indirect functional impairment. During fetal life in utero, the placenta does not act as a total filter; rather it proves permeable to toxics which are able to penetrate the hematoencephalic barrier which shields the fetus. Clinical tests have yet to be devised which reliably signal impending danger of unexpected fetal or infant injury from external toxics.

Key words:  Sudden intrauterine death syndrome (SIUDS)      Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)      Stillbirth      Endocrine disruptors      Pesticides      Brain     
Published:  10 June 2019     
*Corresponding Author(s):  L. RONCATI     E-mail:  emailmedical@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

L. Roncati, A. Manenti, F. Piscioli. Brainstem injury in victims of sudden intrauterine death syndrome (SIUDS) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(3): 349-352.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog5080.2019     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2019/V46/I3/349

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