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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2019, Vol. 46 Issue (6): 892-896    DOI: 10.12891/ceog4744.2019
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Serum zinc, selenium, iron, and copper levels in pregnant women with fetal growth restriction
N. Wibowo1, R. Irwinda1, A.T. Rivai1, *()
1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia
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Abstract  

Background: Fetal growth restriction is associated with many adverse effects and increases the risk of perinatal mortality by more than ten-fold. Zinc, selenium, iron, and copper have important roles in cell proliferation, inflammation, and oxidative stress which possibly serve as the basis for development of fetal growth restriction. Objective: To compare serum zinc, selenium, iron, and copper plasma levels between normal pregnancies and pregnancies with fetal growth restriction. Materials and Methods: The present was a cross-sectional study conducted at Obstetrics Emergency Unit of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Jakarta from February until May 2017. Normal pregnant women and pregnant women with fetal growth restriction were recruited in this study. Maternal blood samples were taken before labor, and serum zinc, selenium, iron, and copper levels measurements were done. Results: Thirty normal pregnancies and 30 pregnancies with fetal growth restriction were enrolled in this study. Mean serum zinc, selenium, iron, and copper levels in normal pregnancy were 42.07 μg/dL, 69.80 μg/L, 70.50 μg/dL, and 2177 μg/L, respectively. Meanwhile, mean serum zinc, selenium, iron, and copper levels in pregnancy with fetal growth restriction were 43.53 μg/dL, 80.83 μg/L, 106 μg/dL, and 2,133.5 μg/L, respectively. There were significant differences in serum selenium concentrations (p = 0.013) and serum iron concentrations (p = 0.009) between the two groups. There were no significant differences in serum zinc and copper levels between both groups. Conclusion: Serum selenium and iron levels were higher in pregnancies with fetal growth restriction. Conclusion: The present study indicates the significant roles of micronutrients and oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of fetal growth restriction.

Key words:  Fetal growth restriction      Zinc      Selenium      Iron      Copper      Micronutrient     
Published:  10 December 2019     
*Corresponding Author(s):  A.T. RIVAI     E-mail:  allantaufiqrivai@yahoo.com

Cite this article: 

N. Wibowo, R. Irwinda, A.T. Rivai. Serum zinc, selenium, iron, and copper levels in pregnant women with fetal growth restriction. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(6): 892-896.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog4744.2019     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2019/V46/I6/892

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