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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2018, Vol. 45 Issue (4): 555-557    DOI: 10.12891/ceog4378.2018
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Is there any association between fetal nervous system anomalies and heavy metal-trace element levels in amniotic fluid?
N. Cim1, *(), H.E. Tolunay1, B. Boza1, M. Bilici2, E. Karaman1, O. Cetin1, R. Yildizhan1, H.G. Sahin1
1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Yuzuncu Yil University Medical Faculty,Van, Turkey
2 Yuzuncu Yil University, Van Security Collage, Van, Turkey
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Abstract  
Aim: In this study the authors aimed to evaluate whether there are any causal relationship between heavy metals-trace elements and fetal malformations of central nervous system (CNS). Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of pregnancies with fetal congenital nervous system anomaly (anencephaly, acrania, neural tube defects, etc.) in 16-22 weeks (n=36). Pregnancies with the same weeks of pregnancy who underwent amniocentesis due to high risk in triple test with the result of normal karyotype constituted the control group (n=30). In the both groups the authors analyzed the heavy metals and trace elements in amniotic fluid. Metals and elements were measured by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer technique with a UNICAM-929 spectrophotometer. Results: When compared, the groups were similar in terms of age, parity, BMI, and gestational week (p > 0.05). In fetal congenital anomaly group the authors detected low levels of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) rather than control groups (p < 0.05). In fetal congenital anomaly group they detected high levels of lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) rather than control groups (p < 0.05). Iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), and Cd levels were similar and there was no significantly difference between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: This study can contribute benefits to the literature in terms of clarifying the pathogenesis of fetal congenital nervous system anomalies.
Key words:  Fetal malformations      Heavy metals      Trace elements      Amniotic fluid     
Published:  10 August 2018     
*Corresponding Author(s):  N. CIM     E-mail:  numancim@yahoo.com

Cite this article: 

N. Cim, H.E. Tolunay, B. Boza, M. Bilici, E. Karaman, O. Cetin, R. Yildizhan, H.G. Sahin. Is there any association between fetal nervous system anomalies and heavy metal-trace element levels in amniotic fluid?. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2018, 45(4): 555-557.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog4378.2018     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2018/V45/I4/555

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