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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (6): 929-933    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3903.2017
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Protein Z and anti-protein Z IgG levels, but not the promotor A13G polymorphism, are associated with preeclampsia
Peng Zhang1, Qi-wen Wu1, Gang Feng1, Chun-sheng Liu1, Ying-ying Zhang1, Chun Pu1, *()
1 Clinical Laboratory, Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, China
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Abstract  
The present study was designed to determine the association between PZ promotor A13G polymorphism, PZ levels, anti-PZ antibodies levels, and the occurrence of preeclampsia (PE). A case-control study including normal pregnant women (control group, n=75) and pregnant women with PE (PE group, n=125) was performed. PZ levels (mg/L) were significantly lower in PE group (1.45 ± 0.21) than control group (2.07 ± 0.29, p < 0.05). The plasma anti-PZ IgG concentrations (AU/ml) in PE group (5.2 ± 0.62) were significantly higher than that in control group (3.3 ± 0.61, p < 0.05), while there were no significant differences of anti-PZ IgM concentrations (AU/ml) between two groups (12.2 ± 0.92 vs. 12.2 ± 1.18, p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that decreased PZ [OR (95% CI) = 200.39 (11.80-3403.91)] and elevated anti-PZ IgG [OR (95% CI) = 0.013 (0.002-0.088)] were independent risk factors of PE. The results suggested that low PZ levels and high anti-PZ IgG levels are associated with the occurrence of PE.
Key words:  Preeclampsia      Protein Z      Anti-protein Z antibodies      Gene polymorphism     
Published:  10 December 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  CHUN PU     E-mail:  chunpu413@sina.com

Cite this article: 

Peng Zhang, Qi-wen Wu, Gang Feng, Chun-sheng Liu, Ying-ying Zhang, Chun Pu. Protein Z and anti-protein Z IgG levels, but not the promotor A13G polymorphism, are associated with preeclampsia. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(6): 929-933.

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https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3903.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I6/929

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