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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2018, Vol. 45 Issue (2): 229-230    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3804.2018
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
MD-TESE-ICSI using fresh sperm resulted in a lower rate of miscarriage compared with frozen-thawed sperm
T. Miyamoto1, *(), K. Abiko1, A. Itabashi1, G. Minase1, H. Ueda1, K. Sengoku1
1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Japan
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Abstract  
Purpose: Frozen-thawed embryo transfer achieves superior pregnancy and miscarriage rates compared with those achieved using fresh embryos, and there is no difference in fertilization rate using fresh versus frozen-thawed sperm collected by microdissection testicular sperm extraction (MD-TESE) when intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is performed. However, there are few reports on the miscarriage rate using fresh versus frozen-thawed testicular sperm collected by MD-TESE. Materials and Methods: The present patient had been unable to conceive because of her husband’s azoospermia. Sperm was successfully collected via MD-TESE. ICSI using fresh or frozenthawed sperm was performed nine times. Results: Two fresh sperm ICSIs resulted in the delivery of two healthy babies. Seven frozen-thawed sperm ICSIs resulted in four pregnancies; however, three of these miscarried, and only one resulted in the delivery of a healthy baby. Conclusion: ICSI using fresh sperm decreased the rate of miscarriage compared with ICSI using frozen-thawed sperm in this patient.
Key words:  Miscarriage      Fresh sperm      Frozen-thawed sperm      ICSI      MD-TESE     
Published:  10 April 2018     
*Corresponding Author(s):  T. MIYAMOTO     E-mail:  toshim@asahikawa-med.ac.jp

Cite this article: 

T. Miyamoto, K. Abiko, A. Itabashi, G. Minase, H. Ueda, K. Sengoku. MD-TESE-ICSI using fresh sperm resulted in a lower rate of miscarriage compared with frozen-thawed sperm. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2018, 45(2): 229-230.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3804.2018     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2018/V45/I2/229

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