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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (5): 798-801    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3586.2017
Case Report Previous articles | Next articles
Breast capillary hemangioma at the tail of Spencer: a rare entity
A. Bothou1, I. Grammatikakis2, N. Evangelinakis2, C. Eftichiadis3, G. Iatrakis1, S. Zervoudis1, *()
1 Rea Maternity Hospital and Technological Educational Institute (TEI), University of Athens, Athens, Greece
2 3rd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Athens, “Attikon” Hospital, Athens, Greece
3 Department of Pathology, General Hospital of Attica (KAT), Athens, Greece
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Abstract  
A palpable breast lump is a frequent clinical finding and preoperative evaluation varies depending on its localization and characteristics. Vascular tumors are rarely diagnosed especially regarding the tail of Spencer region. In general, they appear oval-shaped with wellcircumscribed margins, but their echostructure varies, and it might be quite difficult for the breast specialist to differentiate it from complex cysts, fibroadenomas or some carcinomas. The authors describe a rare location of breast hemangioma with mammographic characteristics that were suspicious for malignancy. There were no identifiable risk factors, no familial history of breast lumps, and patient did not mention the intake of hormonal therapy. The lump was evaluated by mammography and breast ultrasonography, whereas due to the high vascularity of the nodule, the decision not to perform fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was made and an excisional biopsy was performed. The histological result was “breast capillary hemangioma”.
Key words:  Breast hemangioma      Rare breast lump      Capillary hemangioma      Benign breast lump      Oval-shaped breast lump      Hemangioma     
Published:  10 October 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  S. ZERVOUDIS     E-mail:  szervoud@otenet.gr

Cite this article: 

A. Bothou, I. Grammatikakis, N. Evangelinakis, C. Eftichiadis, G. Iatrakis, S. Zervoudis. Breast capillary hemangioma at the tail of Spencer: a rare entity. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(5): 798-801.

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https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3586.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I5/798

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