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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (3): 448-452    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3544.2017
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Effect of maternal pregnancy-induced hypertension on neonatal immunity
Na Lei1, *(), Zhaohua Tian1
1 Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, People's Hospital of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou City, China
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Abstract  Objective: To explore the effect of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) on immune system of neonate. Materials and Methods: Sixty neonates whose mothers suffered from PIH were selected and divided into preeclampsia group (n=28) and gestational hypertension (GH) group (n=32) according to severity of mother’s condition. Thirty neonates having healthy mothers were enrolled as control group. The base clinical characteristics of neonates were collected and umbilical vein blood was drawn to detect the distribution of T lymphocyte antigen, immune globulin, and complement level. Results: The gestational week, birth weight, head circumference, and oneminute Apgar score of both PIH groups were lower than those of control group, and preeclampsia group was lower than GH group (p < 0.05). There was significant difference between preeclampsia group and control group in blood routine and blood glucose levels. Concerning blood glucose levels, both PIH groups were lower than control group, and preeclampsia group was lower than GH group (p < 0.05). Content of IgG and complement C4 of GH group was lower than those of control group; IgG level of preeclampsia group was also lower than GH group (p < 0.05). Conclusions: PIH of pregnant mother affects the immunity of neonate, and more severe PIH will more negatively affect immunity of neonate.
Key words:  Pregnancy-induced hypertension      preeclampsia      gestational hypertension (GH)      immunity      neonate     
Published:  10 June 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  NA LEI     E-mail:  leina37@126.com

Cite this article: 

Na Lei, Zhaohua Tian. Effect of maternal pregnancy-induced hypertension on neonatal immunity. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(3): 448-452.

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https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3544.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I3/448

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