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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (5): 704-709    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3509.2017
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Vaginal microbiota in asymptomatic Brazilian women with HIV
M.K. Figueiredo Facundo1, *(), C.R. de Souza Bezerra Sakano2, C.R. Nogueira de Carvalho3, A.M. de Oliveira Machado4, N.M. de Góis Speck1, J. Chamorro Lascasas Ribalta1
1 Gynecological Disease Prevention Nucleus (NUPREV) of the Gynecology Department of the Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
2 Pathology Department, of the Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
3 Gynecology Department of the Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
4 São Paulo Hospital’s Central Laboratory, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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Abstract  
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of different microorganisms, and the influence of menstrual cycle, CD4+ cells and viral load in vaginal flora, and compare different diagnosis methods in asymptomatic Human immunodeficiency virus HIV- and HIV+ women. Variables like contraception methods, type of sexual intercourse, and menstrual cycle phase were significant between groups. The clinical evaluation of vaginal pH and type of discharge, besides intraepithelial lesions, do not seem to have influence in microflora . Fresh wet-mount microscopy and bacterioscopy demonstrated no difference. HIV+ presented predominance of Gardnerella, Candida, Trichomonas, and Mobiluncus in cervicovaginal cytology, and vaginal culture exhibited higher prevalence of Gram+ and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Fresh wet mount microscopy showed a sensitivity of 88.9%, and the bacterioscopy sensitivity was 75%. Clinical exam specificities were 76.3% and 94.9%, respectively. Asymptomatic HIV+ women may present diversified vaginal microenvironment, possibly making them more prone to pelvic inflammatory disease, sexually transmitted infection (STI), and infertility.
Key words:  HIV      HIV-seropositive      Vaginal microenvironment      Bacterial vaginosis      LGT infection      Asymptomatic women     
Published:  10 October 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  M.K. FIGUEIREDO FACUNDO     E-mail:  mayara.kff@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

M.K. Figueiredo Facundo, C.R. de Souza Bezerra Sakano, C.R. Nogueira de Carvalho, A.M. de Oliveira Machado, N.M. de Góis Speck, J. Chamorro Lascasas Ribalta. Vaginal microbiota in asymptomatic Brazilian women with HIV. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(5): 704-709.

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https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3509.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I5/704

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