Please wait a minute...
Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (2): 190-194    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3324.2017
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Associations of pre-pregnancy obesity with adverse pregnancy outcomes and the optimal gestational weight gain in Japanese women
R. Toma1, S. Aoki1, *(), K. Fujiwara1, F. Hirahara2
1 Perinatal Center for Maternity and Neonate, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yokohama City University Hospital, Yokohama, Japan
Download:  PDF
Export:  BibTeX | EndNote (RIS)      
Abstract  
Objectives: The authors determined associations of maternal pre-pregnancy obesity with adverse pregnancy outcomes and evaluated how gestational weight gain affects risks for such outcomes in Japanese obese pregnant women. Materials and Methods: Among women who delivered at the Perinatal Center for Maternity and Neonatal, Yokohama City University Medical Center, between January 2001 and December 2012, the authors ascertained adverse pregnancy outcome incidences in 207 pre-pregnancy obese (body mass index [BMI] = 30 kg/m2 , obese group), 661 pre-pregnancy overweight (BMI = 25-29.9 kg/m2 , overweight group), and 6,801 pre-pregnancy normal weight (BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m2 , normal group) women. Subjects were stratified by weekly weight gain during the second/third trimesters to investigate associations between gestational weight gain and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimal weight gain for obese pregnant women was also examined. Results: In the obese and overweight groups, incidences of pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), large for gestational age (LGA), preterm birth, preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM), and spontaneous preterm birth were significantly higher than in the normal group. Incidences of adverse pregnancy outcomes were apparently higher in the obese than in the overweight group. In the latter, the incidence of large for gestational age was significantly higher in women with weight gains of 0.5 kg/week, whereas no difference in pregnancy outcomes was observed in the obese group regardless of gestational weight gain. Conclusion: In obese women, incidences of adverse pregnancy outcomes were higher, and pregnancy outcomes were difficult to improve with gestational weight control. Thus, it is important to reach an optimal weight before pregnancy.
Key words:  Body mass index      Gestational weight gain      Japanese women      Obesity      Optimal weight     
Published:  10 April 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  S. AOKI     E-mail:  smyyaoki@yahoo.co.jp

Cite this article: 

R. Toma, S. Aoki, K. Fujiwara, F. Hirahara. Associations of pre-pregnancy obesity with adverse pregnancy outcomes and the optimal gestational weight gain in Japanese women. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(2): 190-194.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3324.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I2/190

[1] F. Wang, Z.X. Liang, W.R. Mao, S.N. He, D.Q. Chen. Influence of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain in twin pregnancies on blood glucose, serum lipid and perinatal outcomes[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(3): 376-382.
[2] K.Y. Yun, S.Y. Hwang, H.J. Lee, S.C. Kim, J.K. Joo, D.S. Suh, K.H. Kim, K.S. Lee. The association of body mass index with incidence, stage and recurrence of endometriosis: case-control study in Korean women[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(1): 53-56.
[3] F. Fabbian, A. Coppola, R. Cappadona, A. De Giorgi, S. Fanaro, E. Di Simone, R. Manfredini, P. Greco, M. A. Rodríguez Borrego, P. J. López Soto. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy: an Italian experience[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(1): 89-92.
[4] L. Yuanmei, Z. Qian, X. Fengsen, W. Yankui. Restricted gestational weight gain in overweight/obese women with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnancy outcomes[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(5): 763-769.
[5] M. Trisovic, O. Mladenovic, J. Bila, K. Lalić, D. Kisic Tepavcevic. The predictive value of metabolic syndrome in the evaluation of pregnancy course and outcome[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(5): 776-778.
[6] M. Mizgier, G. Jarząbek-Bielecka, K. Mruczyk, W. Kędzia. The role of obesity and environmental factors such as diet and physical activity in the etiopathogenesis of fertility disorders[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(4): 516-520.
[7] Z. Kalem, M.N. Kalem, N. Akgün, A.E. Kaya, B. Bakirarar, S. Aydın. The relationship between the levels of anti-Müllerian hormone, vaspin, visfatin, and the patterns of nutrition and menstruation in non-polycystic ovary syndrome and non-obese young women[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(2): 258-264.
[8] A. Turan, F.B. Çeliker. The effect of maternal body mass index on the placental thickness[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(2): 274-276.
[9] Burcin Karamustafaoglu Balci, Bulent Ergun. Prevalence of low vitamin D levels in infertile patients – a single center pilot study[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(1): 104-107.
[10] M. Temur, U. Gök Balci, Y. A. Güçlü, B. Korkmaz, P.Ö. Özbay, N. Soysal, Ö. Yilmaz, T.T. Yilmazer, T. Çift, K. Öngel. Does increase in body mass index effect primary dysmenorrhea?[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(5): 777-781.
[11] A. Antonakou, D. Papoutsis, A. Kechagia. Does gestational weight gain of more than 12 kg in women increase the risk of a cesarean section delivery, gestational diabetes and pregnancy induced hypertension? A retrospective case series[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(4): 540-544.
[12] M.J. Kim, T.H. Kim, Y. Park, H.H. Lee, J.M. Kim, H. Lim, S.Y. Hwang. A study of the dietary intakes by the pre-pregnancy body mass index in pregnant women[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(1): 27-29.
No Suggested Reading articles found!