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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2017, Vol. 44 Issue (1): 27-29    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3208.2017
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
A study of the dietary intakes by the pre-pregnancy body mass index in pregnant women
M.J. Kim1, T.H. Kim2, *(), Y. Park1, H.H. Lee2, J.M. Kim3, H. Lim4, S.Y. Hwang5
1 Department of Food & Nutrition, Hanyang University College of Human Ecology, Seoungdong-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea
2 Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Republic of Korea
3 Departments of Urology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Republic of Korea
4 Department of Nutrition, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon, Republic of Korea
5 Department of Interdisciplinary Program in Biomedical Science, Soonchunhyang University Graduate School, Asan, Republic of Korea
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Abstract  
The authors analyzed the difference in weight gain and nutrition, according to the BMI before pregnancy. They divided 91 subjects into BMI group 1 (normal weight) and BMI group 2 (overweight) before pregnancy. In general, the BMI before pregnancy did not influence weight gain but, in the BMI group 2, the intakes of all of cholesterol, total fatty acids, vitamin B12, iron, and copper were significantly higher. Neither group exhibited sufficient intake of vitamin B1, vitamin B2, niacin, vitamin B6, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, iron, or zinc. Pre-pregnancy weight management and nutrition during pregnancy is very important.
Key words:  Body mass index      Diet      Nutritional status      Pregnant women     
Published:  10 February 2017     
*Corresponding Author(s):  T. H. KIM     E-mail:  heeobgy@schmc.ac.kr

Cite this article: 

M.J. Kim, T.H. Kim, Y. Park, H.H. Lee, J.M. Kim, H. Lim, S.Y. Hwang. A study of the dietary intakes by the pre-pregnancy body mass index in pregnant women. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(1): 27-29.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3208.2017     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2017/V44/I1/27

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