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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2016, Vol. 43 Issue (6): 830-835    DOI: 10.12891/ceog3048.2016
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Impacts of maternal anxiety on non-stress test parameters
S. Nergiz Avcioğlu1, *(), S. Ö. Altinkaya1, İ. Kurt Ömürlü2, M. Küçük3, S. Demircan-Sezer1, H. Yüksel1
1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Adnan Menderes University, School of Medicine, Aydın
2Department of Biostatistics, Adnan Menderes University, School of Medicine, Aydın
3Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University, School of Medicine, Muğla (Turkey)
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Abstract  
Objective: To determine the association between antenatal maternal anxiety with non-stress test (NST) parameters, which is an indicator test of fetal well-being in the third trimester. Materials and Methods: Between January and December of 2013, 212 pregnant women, with 36-41 weeks of gestation were assessed with measures of distress and anxiety with Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and with NST. The new National Institute Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) 2008 guideline criteria were used for interpretation of NST. Anxiety scores were grouped as minimal, mild, moderate, and severe. The impact of anxiety on NST parameters were investigated. Result: Anxiety scores were inversely correlated with fetal heart rate (FHR) accelerations (r = -0.631, and r = -0.855), number of fetal movements (r = -0.633, r = -0.860), FHR variability scores (r = -0.650, r = -0.877). and NST scores (r = -0.505, r = 0.729), (for all p < 0.001). NST scores were lower in severe anxiety group than the others. Conclusion: The study showed that severe form of anxiety significantly affects NST parameters in near-term pregnancies.
Key words:  Anxiety      Antenatal      Non-stress test     
Published:  10 December 2016     
*Corresponding Author(s):  S. NERGİZ AVCIOĞLU     E-mail:  sumeyranergiz80@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

S. Nergiz Avcioğlu, S. Ö. Altinkaya, İ. Kurt Ömürlü, M. Küçük, S. Demircan-Sezer, H. Yüksel. Impacts of maternal anxiety on non-stress test parameters. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2016, 43(6): 830-835.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog3048.2016     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2016/V43/I6/830

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