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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2016, Vol. 43 Issue (3): 417-421    DOI: 10.12891/ceog2130.2016
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Late gestational liver dysfunction and its impact on pregnancy outcomes
D. X. Zhou1, X. Y. Bian1, *(), X. Y. Cheng2, P. Xu1, Y. F. Zhang1, J. X. Zhong3, H. Y. Qian4, S. Huang5
1Department of Internal Medicine, Nantong MCH Hospital, Nantong
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nantong MCH Hospital, Nantong
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong
4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Qidong People' s Hospital, Qidong
5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haimen People' s Hospital, Nantong (China)
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Abstract  
Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of late gestational liver dysfunction and its impact on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: The patients hospitalized for liver dysfunction in their late pregnancy between 2010-2012 were set as the observation group, and the pregnant women with normal liver function at the same period were randomly selected and set as the control group. The impacts towards the pregnancy outcomes were compared between these two groups and the impacts of differentdegree transaminase increasing towards the pregnancy outcome were analyzed. Results: The incidence rates of cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, fetal distress, premature birth, premature rupture of membranes (PROM) of the observation group and the transaminase-severely-increased group (the severe group) were higher, and the differences were statistically significant (p < 0.01 or < 0.05); while only the cesarean rate of the mild and moderate group was significantly different from the control group (p < 0.01 or < 0.05). The ratios of intrahepatic cholestasis in pregnancy (ICP), gestational hypertension + HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver in pregnancy (AFLP) of the severe group were higher than the mild and moderate group, and the differences were statistically significant; the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) group and the unknown cause group mainly showed a mildly increased transaminase; the distributions of viral hepatitis in pregnancy (VHP), post-viral-hepatitis-B cirrhosis, biliary tract disease, and infected toxic liver dysfunctionin different-degree increased transaminase groups had no significant difference. Conclusions: Liver dysfunction in later pregnancy, especially with severe transaminase increase, might significantly increase the risk of adverse maternal events. The major causes of severe liver dysfunction in late pregnancy were ICP, gestational hypertensive disorders, and AFLP.
Key words:  Late pregnancy      Liver dysfunction      Transaminase      Pregnancy outcome      Perinatal infant     
Published:  10 June 2016     
*Corresponding Author(s):  X.Y. BIAN     E-mail:  xiaoyunbian@126.com

Cite this article: 

D. X. Zhou, X. Y. Bian, X. Y. Cheng, P. Xu, Y. F. Zhang, J. X. Zhong, H. Y. Qian, S. Huang. Late gestational liver dysfunction and its impact on pregnancy outcomes. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2016, 43(3): 417-421.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog2130.2016     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2016/V43/I3/417

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