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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2015, Vol. 42 Issue (6): 827-832    DOI: 10.12891/ceog2023.2015
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MRI in the assessment of prolapsed pedunculated submucous leiomyomas: two case reports
V. Fiaschetti1, M. Fornari1, V. Cama1, *(), M. Rascioni1, V. Liberto1, G. Sorrenti2, G. Simonetti1
1Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiation Therapy, University of Tor Vergata, Rome
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)
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Abstract  
Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign gynecological tumors affecting 20-30% of women in reproductive age. Despite their benignity, in some cases several symptoms may require surgical intervention. Submucosal leiomyomas are less frequent (5-10%), but are usually symptomatic. Approximately 2.5% of the myomas are pedunculated and can protrude in the cervical canal. Symptomatic leiomyomas can be treated either by hysterectomy or myomectomy, and these procedures can be performed with several techniques. Whenever possible, hysteroscopic myomectomy is better because it has many advantages, as it also preserves future fertility. Two interesting cases of prolapsed pedunculated submucous leiomyomas are reported in order to prove that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential to choose the most appropriate treatment and to perform an adequate presurgical planning, which must be based on an overall assessment of the leiomyoma’s characteristics (number, location, size and presence or absence of a stalk) and the patient’s characteristics.
Key words:  Prolapsed pedunculated submucous leiomyomas      Magnetic resonance imaging      Stalk      Hysteroscopic myomectomy     
Published:  10 December 2015     
*Corresponding Author(s):  V. CAMA     E-mail:  valentinacama@gmail.com

Cite this article: 

V. Fiaschetti, M. Fornari, V. Cama, M. Rascioni, V. Liberto, G. Sorrenti, G. Simonetti. MRI in the assessment of prolapsed pedunculated submucous leiomyomas: two case reports. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(6): 827-832.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog2023.2015     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2015/V42/I6/827

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