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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2015, Vol. 42 Issue (5): 711-713    DOI: 10.12891/ceog1989.2015
Case Report Previous articles | Next articles
Prenatal diagnosis of lipomyelomeningocele by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
T. Felekis1, *(), I. Korkontzelos1, C. Akrivis1, P. Tsirkas1, A. Zagaliki1
1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, “G. Hatzikosta” General State Hospital, Ioannina (Greece)
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Abstract  
Objective: The authors report a case of a lipomyelomeningocele with tethered cord, revealed on prenatal ultrasonography and confirmed by fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: A 32-year-old woman, gravida 1 para 1 underwent the routine second trimester prenatal ultrasound scan at 22+5 weeks of gestation at the present hospital. Results: The scan indicated an echoic semisolid subcutaneous mass covered by skin, posterior to the lumbosacral spinal canal of the fetus. Based on the findings indicating occult dysraphism, a fetal MRI examination was conducted, revealing that the mass was extending to the spinal cord, tethering the cauda equina. The diagnosis of lipomyelomeningocele was established. Conclusion: Lipomyelomeningocele is a form of closed neural tube defect with unclear predisposing factors. Its prevalence ranges between 0.3 and 0.6 per 10,000 live births. It leads to progressive conus tethering with associated neurological, urinary, and gastrointestinal deficits, demonstrating the importance of prenatal diagnosis.
Key words:  Lipomyelomeningocele      Spinal dysraphism      Occult spina bifida      Tethered cord      Fetal MRI      Prenatal ultrasound     
Published:  10 October 2015     
*Corresponding Author(s):  T. FELEKIS     E-mail:  dr.felek@hotmail.com

Cite this article: 

T. Felekis, I. Korkontzelos, C. Akrivis, P. Tsirkas, A. Zagaliki. Prenatal diagnosis of lipomyelomeningocele by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(5): 711-713.

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https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog1989.2015     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2015/V42/I5/711

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