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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2015, Vol. 42 Issue (5): 679-680    DOI: 10.12891/ceog1963.2015
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Complete resolution of frozen shoulder syndrome in a woman treated with dextroamphetamine sulfate for chronic urinary urgency
J.H. Check1, 2, *(), R. Cohen2, 3
1Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility, Camden, New Jersey,
2Cooper Institute for Reproductive Hormonal Disorders, P.C. Marlton, New Jersey
3Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Philadelphia, PA (USA)
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Abstract  
Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of dextroamphetamine sulfate for idiopathic frozen shoulder in a woman being treated for bladder urgency and inability to lose weight despite dieting. Materials and Methods: Dextroamphetamine sulfate was initiated at 15 mg extended release capsules increasing to 25 mg extended release capsules to a 47-year-old woman. Results: She lost 19 pounds in four months, her bladder urgency disappeared, and she had complete resolution of the idiopathic frozen shoulder problem. Conclusions: Idiopathic frozen shoulder syndrome can be added to the long list of conditions that are related to hypofunction of the sympathetic nervous system and all respond to dextroamphetamine sulfate therapy. They gynecologist is more familial with this syndrome because of it being the main cause of pelvic pain. Thus the gynecologist may become the physician who subsequently treats orthopedic or rheumatological problems or other health issues.
Key words:  Idiopathic frozen shoulder      Urinary urgency      Obesity      Sympathomimetic amines     
Published:  10 October 2015     
*Corresponding Author(s):  J.H. CHECK     E-mail:  laurie@ccivf.com

Cite this article: 

J.H. Check, R. Cohen. Complete resolution of frozen shoulder syndrome in a woman treated with dextroamphetamine sulfate for chronic urinary urgency. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(5): 679-680.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog1963.2015     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2015/V42/I5/679

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