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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2015, Vol. 42 Issue (5): 634-639    DOI: 10.12891/ceog1948.2015
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
AT1R A1166C polymorphism and risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension: a meta-analysis of case control studies
H.Y. Wang1, , X.Q. He1, , Z.G. Wang1, *(), M. Fan1, H.X. Liu1
1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beijing (China)
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Abstract  
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to perform a quantitative review of previous case control studies examining the association between AT1RA1166C polymorphism and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). Materials and Methods: Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used as measures of effect sizes. Overall effect sizes were derived using a random-effects model or fixed-effects model when appreciated, and stratified by ethnicity. Funnel plots and Egger’s regression asymmetry tests were utilized for publication bias detection. Results: A total of ten articles (including 920 PIH cases and 1408 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. The overall effect sizes (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.54 - 2.98, p < 0.00001) of additive model indicated PIH patients had a significant higher frequency of allele C. Meanwhile, the OR of the dominant model was 2.22 (95% CI: 1.51 - 3.26, p < 0.00001) which signified that PIH patients also had a significant higher frequency of AC+CC genotypes. The subgroup analyses were in line with the overall outcomes except the Caucasians PIH patients had a non-significant CA+CC genotypes (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 0.95 - 1.98, p > 0.05). The Egger’s test of additive model (p = 0.451) and dominant model (p = 0.623) revealed no statistical significance for publication bias. Conclusion: The meta-analysis suggested that the AT1R A1166C polymorphism was significantly associated with the PIH, especially in Asian subjects.
Key words:  AT1R      A1166C polymorphism      Meta-analysis      Pregnancy-induced hypertension      Previous case control studies     
Published:  10 October 2015     
*Corresponding Author(s):  Z.G. WANG     E-mail:  zhenguowang2014@163.com
About author:  These authors contributed equally.

Cite this article: 

H.Y. Wang, X.Q. He, Z.G. Wang, M. Fan, H.X. Liu. AT1R A1166C polymorphism and risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension: a meta-analysis of case control studies. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(5): 634-639.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog1948.2015     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2015/V42/I5/634

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