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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2015, Vol. 42 Issue (3): 327-330    DOI: 10.12891/ceog1819.2015
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Fetal abdominal wall defects: six years experience at a tertiary center
A. Ekin1, *(), C. Gezer1, C.E. Taner1, M. Ozeren1, M.E. Avci1, S. Ciftci1, A. Dogan1, N.S. Gezer2
1Department of Perinatology, Izmir Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, Izmir
2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey)
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Abstract  
The authors’ aim was to detect the associated anomalies and their effect on the management of the fetuses with omphalocele and gastroschisis. Between the period of 2007-2013, the data of fetuses with abdominal wall defects were analyzed. Chromosomal abnormalities and associated morphologic anomalies diagnosed by ultrasonography and autopsy were evaluated. Of the 61 fetuses, ten (20.4%) omphalocele cases and nine (75%) gastroschisis cases were isolated. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in seven fetuses with omphalocele cases. All fetuses with abnormal karyotypes had multiple additional anomalies. Termination rate was 65.3% for omphalocele group versus none in the gastroschisis group. To give better counseling about the prognosis and outcome of the fetuses with abdominal wall defects, detection of additional anomalies as well as type of the defect are essential tools even if the karyotype is normal.
Key words:  Abdominal wall defects      Chromosomal abnormality      Fetal anomaly      Gastroschisis      Omphalocele     
Published:  10 June 2015     
*Corresponding Author(s):  A. EKIN     E-mail:  atalayekin@hotmail.com

Cite this article: 

A. Ekin, C. Gezer, C.E. Taner, M. Ozeren, M.E. Avci, S. Ciftci, A. Dogan, N.S. Gezer. Fetal abdominal wall defects: six years experience at a tertiary center. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(3): 327-330.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog1819.2015     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2015/V42/I3/327

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