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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2014, Vol. 41 Issue (5): 530-533    DOI: 10.12891/ceog17092014
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Craniofacial catch-up growth in intrauterine growth retarded rats following postnatal nutritional rehabilitation
M.E. Luna1, *(), F.A. Quintero1, 2, M.F. Cesani1, M.C. Fucini1, 3, V. Prío4, L.M. Guimarey1, E.E. Oyhenart1, 2
1Institute of Veterinary Genetics, National Scientific and Research Council, University of La Plata, La Plata
2Faculty of Natural Science and Museum, University of La Plata, La Plata
3Faculty of Odontology, University of La Plata, La Plata
4Faculty of Veterinaty Science, University of La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)
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Abstract  
Purpose: The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of postnatal nutritional rehabilitation on the craniofacial growth in rats with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Materials and Methods: Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following groups: control, Sham-operated, and IUGR. The IUGR was produced by uterine vessels bending (day 14 of pregnancy). At days 1, 21, 42, 63, and 84 of postnatal life, each animal was X-rayed, and neural and facial length, width and height were measured. Volumetric and morphometric indices were calculated. Results: The decreased maternal-fetal blood flow during the last-third of the gestation period modified cranial size and shape of both sexes at birth. Discussion: Postnatal nutritional rehabilitation is not fully sufficient to reverse the prenatal growth retardation. There are specific responses depending on the sex and the age of the IUGR pups. Regardless of the changes in size, the shape is not modified during all the postnatal period.
Key words:  Intrauterine growth retardation      Postnatal nutritional rehabilitation     
Published:  10 October 2014     
*Corresponding Author(s):  M. E. LUNA     E-mail:  lunamariaeugenia@hotmail.com

Cite this article: 

M.E. Luna, F.A. Quintero, M.F. Cesani, M.C. Fucini, V. Prío, L.M. Guimarey, E.E. Oyhenart. Craniofacial catch-up growth in intrauterine growth retarded rats following postnatal nutritional rehabilitation. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2014, 41(5): 530-533.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog17092014     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2014/V41/I5/530

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