Please wait a minute...
Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2014, Vol. 41 Issue (3): 280-282    DOI: 10.12891/ceog16942014X
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Amniotic fluid amino acid concentrations in fetal skeletal dysplasia
E. Kale1, A. Kale2, *()
1Kocaeli Derince Education and Research Hospital, Department of Biochemistry
2Kocaeli Derince Education and Research Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kocaeli (Turkey)
Download:  PDF(55KB)  ( 8 )
Export:  BibTeX | EndNote (RIS)      
Abstract  
The authors’ objective was to measure amniotic fluid amino acid concentrations in pregnant women diagnosed as having fetuses with skeletal dysplasia in the second trimester of pregnancy. Eighteen pregnant women who had fetuses with with skeletal dysplasia detected by ultrasonography (skeletal dysplasia) in the second trimester and 35 women who had abnormal triple screenings indicating an increased risk for Down syndrome, but had healthy fetuses (control group), were enrolled in the study. Amniotic fluid was obtained by amniocentesis. The chromosomal analysis of the study and control groups was normal. Levels of free amino acids and non-essential amino acids were measured in amniotic fluid samples using GC/FID free (physiological) amino acid kit by gas chromatography. The mean levels of essential amino acids (histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine) in amniotic fluid were found to be significantly lower in fetuses with skeletal dysplasia than in the control group (p < 0.05). The detection of significantly lower amino acid concentrations in the amniotic fluid of fetuses with a skeletal dysplasia compared to healthy fetuses suggests amino acid deficiency may play an etiological role in the pathogenesis of skeletal dysplasia.
Key words:  Amino acids      Skeletal dysplasia      Amniotic fluid     
Published:  10 June 2014     
*Corresponding Author(s):  A. KALE     E-mail:  ahmetkale5@yahoo.com

Cite this article: 

E. Kale, A. Kale. Amniotic fluid amino acid concentrations in fetal skeletal dysplasia. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2014, 41(3): 280-282.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog16942014X     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2014/V41/I3/280

[1] Midori Fujisaki, Seishi Furukawa, Hiroshi Sameshima. Twin amniotic fluid discordance below 26 weeks of gestation for predicting adverse outcomes[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2021, 48(1): 53-58.
[2] R. Suvannasarn, T. Tongsong, P. Jatavan. Amniotic fluid embolism: the pathophysiology, diagnostic clue, and blood biomarkers indicator for disease prediction[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(2): 159-165.
[3] R. Dias Nunes, E. Traebert, M. Seemann, J. Traebert. Evaluation of simple and low-cost diagnostic tests for premature rupture of membranes[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2020, 47(2): 287-290.
[4] F.M. Andrade, E.F.M. Santana, E. Araujo Júnior, S.G.A. Andrade, J. Bortoletti Filho, A.M. Amed, A.F. Moron. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of amniotic fluid for diagnosis of fetal toxoplasmosis[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2019, 46(4): 593-595.
[5] N. Cim, H.E. Tolunay, B. Boza, M. Bilici, E. Karaman, O. Cetin, R. Yildizhan, H.G. Sahin. Is there any association between fetal nervous system anomalies and heavy metal-trace element levels in amniotic fluid?[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2018, 45(4): 555-557.
[6] Yi-Hua Zhou, Li-Hua Hu, Cha-Hua Huang, Hui-hui Bao, Xie-Fei Qi, Xiao-Shu Cheng. Infection caused by amniotic fluid embolism complicated with disseminated intravascular coagulation: a case report[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(6): 966-969.
[7] U. Indraccolo, R. Ventrone, G. Scutiero, P. Greco, S.R. Indraccolo. Interventions for treating amniotic fluid embolism: a systematic review with meta-analysis[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2017, 44(5): 666-677.
[8] T. Goto, T. Sugiura, R. Awaya, H. Ueda, E. Mizutani, K. Ito, R. Nagasaki, T. Kato, S. Saitoh. Survival of fetuses with severe oligohydramnios[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2016, 43(3): 341-344.
[9] M. Kaba, Y. Engin-Ustun, G. Kaba, E. G. Yapar Eyi, S. Uysal, L. Mollamahmutoglu. N terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptide in fetal umbilical cord meconium-stained amniotic fluid: a prospective case control study[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2016, 43(3): 370-373.
[10] M. Zamurović, D. Damnjanović. Pulmonary embolism during delivery – treatment and outcome[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2015, 42(6): 833-834.
[11] M. Gojnic, T. Stefanovic, M. Perovic, B. Arsic, E. Garalejic, J. Micic, Z. Maricic, R. Ratkovic, A. Ljubic. Prediction of fetal macrosomia with ultrasound parameters and maternal glycemic controls in gestational diabetes mellitus[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2012, 39(4): 512-515.
[12] A. Kale, E. Kale. The role of amino acids in spina bifida[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2012, 39(3): 374-375.
[13] M.T. Canda, O. Sezer, C. Ozturk, N. Demir. Expectant management of preterm premature rupture of membranes remote from term with exiguous amniotic fluid and a prolonged latency period: report of two cases[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2012, 39(2): 247-248.
[14] A. D’Alfonso, D. Piancatelli, D. Maccarone, D. Adorno, P. Iovenitti, G. Carta. Cytokine levels in amniotic fluid: a marker of preterm labor?[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2006, 33(1): 34-35.
[15] D. Gramellini, G. Piantelli, O. Di Marino, A. Avanzini, E. Vadora. Amniotic fluid index variations after amniocentesis, amnioinfusion and amnioreduction: preliminary data[J]. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 1997, 24(2): 70-73.
No Suggested Reading articles found!