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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2014, Vol. 41 Issue (1): 75-77    DOI: 10.12891/ceog16012014
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The sympathetic neural hyperalgesia/edema syndrome, a common cause of female pelvic pain, manifesting as a pseudopheochromocytoma with marked clinical improvement with sympathomimetic amines
J.H. Check1, *(), R. Cohen2, B. Katsoff3
1The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Camden Cooper Hospital/University Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Division of Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility, Camden, NJ
2Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Philadelphia, PA
3Temple University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Philadelphia PA (USA)
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Abstract  
Purpose: To show that a common but not well-known disorder of the sympathetic nervous system can present with symptoms suggesting a pheochromocytoma. Materials and Methods: The standard treatment of this disorder (which is characterized by an abnormal water load test), i.e., sympathomimetic amine therapy, was given to a woman with paroxysmal tachycardia and hypertension. Results: Over a period of six months, the treatment eradicated the paroxysmal symptoms to which all other therapies had failed. Conclusions: This condition recently named as sympathetic neural hyperalgesia edema syndrome can present with symptoms of a pheochromocytoma and will respond to therapy with low dosages of dextroamphetamine sulfate.
Key words:  Pheochromocytoma      Sympathomimetic amines      Hypertension      Paroxysmal tachycardia     
Published:  10 February 2014     
*Corresponding Author(s):  J.H. CHECK     E-mail:  laurie@ccivf.com

Cite this article: 

J.H. Check, R. Cohen, B. Katsoff. The sympathetic neural hyperalgesia/edema syndrome, a common cause of female pelvic pain, manifesting as a pseudopheochromocytoma with marked clinical improvement with sympathomimetic amines. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2014, 41(1): 75-77.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog16012014     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2014/V41/I1/75

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