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Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology  2014, Vol. 41 Issue (1): 52-57    DOI: 10.12891/ceog15712014
Original Research Previous articles | Next articles
Epidemiological investigation of physique situation for birth high-risk children aged 9-15 years in Chengdu, Southwest China
F. Xiong1, 2, F. Yang1, T.Z. Huo2, 3, P. Li2, 3, M. Mao2, 3, 4, *()
1Department of Pediatrics, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu
2Laboratory of Early Developmental and Injuries, West China Institute of Woman and Children's Health, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu
3Key Laboratory of Obstetric & Gynecologic and Pediatric Diseases and Birth Defects of Ministry of Education, Chengdu
4Chengdu Women's and Children's Central Hospital, Chengdu (China)
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Abstract  
Background: As the intrauterine environment can effect children's growth and development, this study aimed to explore the relationship between birth high-risk and physique situation of 9 to 15-year-old children by cross-sectional investigation, and to provide clues for the monitoring, prevention, and treatment of growth deviation in children. Materials and Methods: This study recruited 7,194 students aged 9 to 15 years in primary and junior schools. Their parents were asked to complete the birth situation questionnaire. Measurements included height, weight, and body mass index (BMI). Birth high-risk infant was defined according to the gestational age and birth weight. Growth deviation was classified as underweight, short stature, overweight, and obesity. Results: The prevalence of all kinds of growth deviations in preterm, full-term, and post-term birth groups were similar, the same as the physique situation at school age among both sexes. The incidence of small for gestational age (SGA) was 6.23%, when at school age, part of SGA had catch-up growth. However, the prevalence of underweight and short stature for SGA was highest in three groups. The weight and height at school age in SGA group was less than that in appropriate for gestational age (AGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) groups. The prevalence of overweight and obesity for LGA and macrosomia were highest in three groups. At school age, the weight in macrosomia and LGA groups was higher than that in the other groups. Conclusions: Longitudinal height and weight development and growth of children with birth high-risk are different from normal children. In order to improve healthy situation, more attention should be paid to height and weight development of those children with birth high-risk at school age, even in pre-school age. Prevention may already begin during pregnancy.
Key words:  Birth high-risk      Puberty      Overweight      Obesity      Short stature     
Published:  10 February 2014     
*Corresponding Author(s):  M. MAO     E-mail:  mengmaocn@yeah.net

Cite this article: 

F. Xiong, F. Yang, T.Z. Huo, P. Li, M. Mao. Epidemiological investigation of physique situation for birth high-risk children aged 9-15 years in Chengdu, Southwest China. Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2014, 41(1): 52-57.

URL: 

https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/10.12891/ceog15712014     OR     https://ceog.imrpress.com/EN/Y2014/V41/I1/52

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